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Collections of Indian Warrior Art items

Central Plains

Central Plains

Original & replica artifacts after or in style of the tribes of the Central Plains and Prairie regions (portion of the Great Plains and Prairies which lies south of the South Dakota-Nebraska border and north of the Arkansas River. It includes Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, southeastern Wyoming, and western Colorado; Plains tribes: Arapaho, Arikara, Northern and Southern Cheyenne, Hidatsa, Mandan; Central Prairie tribes: Dakota (Santee Sioux), Iowa, Meskwaki, Missouria, Kansa (Kaw), Pawnee, Ponca, Omaha, Otoe, Sauk, Yankton-Sioux)
Lakota Itazipcho

Lakota Itazipcho

Is a collection that unites items, created by me and Native American Artists Joe and Angie of Cherokee Indian decent, and honoring Lakota Sioux Itazipcho (Sans Arc) chief.
Northern Plains

Northern Plains

Original & replica artifacts after or in style of the tribes of the Northern Plains and Prairie regions (Montana, Alberta, Saskatchewan, the Dakotas, Minnesota, and Wyoming; Plains tribes: Assiniboine, Atsina, Blackfeet (Piegan, Blood or Kainai, Blackfoot, Siksika), Plains Cree, Sarsi, Stoney, Teton Lakota; Northern Prairie tribes: Plains Ojibwa).
Southern Plains

Southern Plains

Original & replica artifacts after or in style of the tribes of the Southern Plains and Prairie regions (Comanche, Kiowa and the Kiowa-Apache, Lipan Apache, Tonkawa; Southern Prairie tribes: Osage, Quapaw, Wichita).
Transmontane

Transmontane

The Transmontane Collection repsesents Indian artifacts (either original or replica) featuring a mixture of cultural traits (primarily quillwork and beadwork styles and techiques) of Central Plains (Crow) and Plateau tribes, i.e done in the so called Transmontane Style. Transmontane beadwork designs emphasize panels or bands divided by transverse stripes containing smooth hourglass or triangular forms in pastel colors, against a light blue or lavender pink background. In quillwork — quilling with a technique called quill-wrapped horsehair, which is done by carefully winding the flattened and died barbs around slender bundles of hair. Another decorative technique is dress embellishing with precious eye-teeth or tushes of many elk.

 

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